Kingsley Udeh, M.S. in Technology Management



Alumni

“People think engineering is too difficult, and we want to build an understanding, especially among domestic students, that it’s not.”

Home country: Nigeria

When he was in high school in Nigeria, Kingsley Udeh dreamed of becoming a doctor. He wanted to help people, make a difference.

Then he went to college. “My intention was to study medicine,” he says. “But along the way, I just couldn’t keep up with the demands. It was my uncle who suggested computer science and engineering. He told me, ‘Why don’t you try it?’ When I realized I had an ability for it, I went into it. I changed plans.”

It was a far better fit. At 35, Udeh will receive his Master’s in Technology Management with a concentration in Project Management. He hopes to use his degree in IT, banking, or engineering.

In the meantime, Udeh has sought out opportunities to use his skills to help others. He developed a software system for the Bridgeport chapter of American Red Cross, for example, that allows the nonprofit to match volunteer opportunities with individuals, based on their skills, availability, and interests.

In March, Google and the Connecticut Small Business Development Center ran a day of workshops and instructional seminars at the University that showed business owners how to build websites so they could get their ventures online. Udeh was among the first to volunteer.

“We helped design and make a website for a woman who owns a boutique in New Haven,” says Udeh. “It was exciting.”

He also worked on developing a website geared to high school and college students that encourages them to test their math and engineering skills by tackling a series of challenges. “People think engineering is too difficult, and we want to build an understanding, especially among domestic students, that it’s not,” says Udeh. “This will be something where they’ll be able to log on to a web-based system and solve problems, and hopefully realize that engineering is not as complicated as they think.”

Kali Mason, B.A. in Literature and Civilization



Alumni

“It made the difference between going back to school or not, and I’m not sure what I would have done if it hadn’t been for that.”

Without the Bigelow, she wouldn’t have made it.

At least, that’s how Kali Mason tells the story. The 21-year-old, who graduates on May 5 with honors and a Bachelor of Art in Literature and Civilization, was about to start her sophomore year at UB when her father was laid off. Without his income, Mason would have to delay college, get a job, and figure out Plan B.

Desperate, she contacted the financial aid office. Because of her top marks (she had a 3.8 gpa at the time) Mason was invited to apply for a David and Eunice Bigelow Scholarship. Two weeks before the fall semester began in 2010, Mason got the good news: she had won the award.

“The Bigelow was significant. It made the difference between going back to school or not, and I’m not sure what I would have done if it hadn’t been for that. I was afraid I’d never finish college at all,” says Mason, who returned to campus with an intensity to learn and experience as much as possible.

Classes with history professor Thomas Juliusburger (enlivened by his personal accounts of England and studies at Oxford) and philosophy classes with Timothy Eves made Mason hungry to learn more about the subjects and to travel to Europe. During her junior spring, she was accepted to a program in Paros, Greece, where she spent the semester studying philosophy, art history, and ancient history.

Mason’s passion for learning helped her maintain superlative grades as she balanced school with work-study jobs; she won other scholarships to help pay for college. This year, Mason also interned at the Museum of the City of New York, where she helped host and plan lectures, walking tours of Manhattan, and exhibition openings.

“There was one night where they had a chair on view from the 1930s. It was on loan from the Met [Metropolitan Museum of Art], and they didn’t want anything to happen to it, so they asked me to watch the gallery. I had to babysit the chair,” says Mason.

Mason will see a lot more art in the not-so-distant future: she was accepted to a master’s degree program in museum studies in Florence, Italy, that starts in the fall. And she ultimately hopes to learn how to restore and preserve ancient documents and books or be a museum curator. “I’ve already found a program,” she says with characteristic enthusiasm. “It’s in Canada!”

Justin Hume, M.A. in Global Development and Peace



Alumni

“My experience helped to give me a first hand understanding of microcredit and loan distribution.”

Microfinance Internship in Africa

I had the opportunity to perform an internship at the Grounded and Holistic Approach to People’s Empowerment (GHAPE), a social model microfinance organization located in the North West Region of Cameroon.

There, I worked with the office staff performing the regular duties of a GHAPE credit officer. I wrote grants, created borrower profiles for the Kiva website, and was even involved in the day-to-day financial aspects of the organization (data entry, loan distribution, and borrower check-ups). In between our regular duties, during my stay, we secured three separate grants for increasing borrower education, for creating a new borrowing center, and even one more grant for establishing a third major office in Momo Division.

Gaining First-Hand Understanding

Together, these things served as a capstone experience to the University of Bridgeport’s masters program in Global Development and Peace, and not only helped to give me a first hand understanding of microcredit and loan distribution, but also helped me to become much more in tune with the challenges that many countries face in building a better tomorrow.

A Deeper Perspective

With these experiences in hand, I have since been able to the following:

  • Join the faculty of the College of Public and International Affairs
  • Write on the subject of microloan distribution from a more informed perspective
  • Become involved in the building of a new Non-Governmental Organization with the help of two other students from the Global Development and Peace program
  • Expand our activities beyond more academic pursuits and on in to helping people in the rural villages of East Africa

Wayne Travers, Jr.





“IDEAL gave me that challenge: the opportunity combined with flexibility in completing my undergraduate degree.”

Major: IDEAL
Class Year: ’06

After I turned forty I wanted to avert a midlife crisis by taking on a challenge. IDEAL gave me that challenge: the opportunity combined with flexibility in completing my undergraduate degree.

The courses were challenging and my professors were thoughtful and caring. My capstone instructor, Professor Chepya, inspired me to further my education and consider a post-business career in teaching.

My advice to you: Look at the IDEAL program and if it fits in your lifestyle and needs, enroll.

Shawnte Hudgins, DC





“Attending UBCC was a turning point for me. It was the moment that began my transition from having a job to having a career.”


Major:
Chiropractic

Attending UBCC was a turning point for me. It was the moment that began my transition from having a job to having a career; one that I enjoyed and could be proud of. The chiropractic education I received helped me to focus my path towards a patient-centered practice, and prepared me to help improve the quality of life of others. Coming from a research background, I appreciated the attention towards teaching students to use the most current evidence-based research to help facilitate the care of our patients, and ensuring that as practitioners, we were abreast of the latest information.

Scott Michael Schreiber





“UBs’ multiple degree programs and excellent education provided the foundation to succeed.”

Major: Chiropractic

The University of Bridgeport prepared me for practicing in an ever changing healthcare environment. The multiple degree programs and excellent education provided the foundation to succeed. It allowed me to pursue specialization within the profession and make communication possible between other medical professionals. Due to the education I received, I was able to start my practice with the confidence and ability to get sick people well.

Sandra Sigmundsdóttir, DC





“I thank UBCC for giving me the confidence to open up my own practice and to introduce chiropractic profession to Icelanders.”

Major: Chiropractic
Class Year: ’05

I came to UB in 1999 on a soccer scholarship to study biology. The first years were hard for me because of the language barrier but I had good friends and teachers that helped me. Everyday going to soccer practice I walked past the College of Chiropractic, and I had no clue what chiropractic was. I had to look it up in a dictionary. It fascinated me straight away and from then I knew what my profession would be.

After I got my BS in biology I started the chiropractic program in spring 2002. The program surprised me in a good way from the beginning and throughout the 4 years. The thing I liked most about UBCC was its outstanding faculty; they were both professional and personal. I also liked how the program was build up; all the basics were covered very well, everything from anatomy to adjusting, and how to approach patients. Even though the program was very intense throughout these four years I loved every minute of it.

Finally, I want to thank UBCC for giving me the confidence to open up my own practice and to introduce chiropractic profession to Icelanders, because when I graduated in December 2005 I was only the 6th chiropractor in Iceland.

Randi Jimenez, DC





“UB’s smaller class sizes make each student feel more like a person than a number, nobody gets lost in the shuffle.”

Major: Chiropractic
Class Year: ’07

The education I received at UBCC was top notch. I was provided with all the tools needed to become a great chiropractor. With the curriculum starting with a strong concentration on basic sciences, I was given a solid base on which I was able to enter the clinical world a step ahead of the rest. UBCC excels academically, educating their students that every aspect of a doctor’s interaction with a patient is significant. Despite being situated in a university setting the chiropractic college has maintained a smaller class size making each student feel more like a person than a number, nobody gets lost in the shuffle. UBCC played a significant part in helping me to achieve success in my career as a chiropractor.

Raluca Duma





“I am confident that I have become a competent chiropractic physician ready to start my professional career”

Major: Chiropractic

Thanks to my professors’ and clinicians’ patience, knowledge and skill, I know that I have been provided with the tools to successfully diagnose and treat my future patients. The evidence based learning model taught at UBCC trained me to make educated clinical decisions which are crucial in providing health care to patients.

I look forward to a rewarding career and the satisfaction of becoming a University of Bridgeport Doctor of Chiropractic alumna!

Norman T. Eng, DC, CCSP®, CSCS





“The emphasis of the curriculum on science and evidence has kept me in touch with the latest research and technology in health care.”

Major: Chiropractic

Doctor of Chiropractic, Certified Chiropractic Sports Practitioner, Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist

Chiropractic is a dynamic and rapidly growing profession, and The University of Bridgeport College of Chiropractic has pioneered educational standards in the field. The emphasis of the curriculum on science and evidence has kept me in touch with the latest research and technology in health care. Its partnerships with institutions like the Veterans Affairs Hospital have trained me so that I can provide the community with the latest and greatest treatments available.