Volodymyr Kebalo, M.A. in Global Development and Peace



Alumni

“The classes are like one big family to me.”

Where are you from?
Ukraine

What is your field of study?
Culture and Conflict Resolution

What do you enjoy most about the program?
I enjoy having the opportunity to communicate with international students. The GLDP classes are like one big family to me.

What has your classroom experience taught you?
My writing skills have greatly improved, thanks to the many research papers, while I have also had the opportunity to enhance my presentation skills.

What do you hope to do after graduation?
I hope to be working for the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in my home country of Ukraine, and to ultimately pursue a career in politics.

Fun Facts:

Previous education
BA, International Law, Ivan Franko National University of L’viv, Ukraine

Previous work experience
Intromisiya, Legal intern, Ukraine

Current employment
Office System of Connecticut, Court Interpreter, Connecticut

Languages
Ukrainian, English, Russian, Croatian, German

Rakel Hinriksdottir, B.A. in Graphic Design



Alumni

“UB gave me just what I wanted—a chance to build a solid graphic design portfolio and play sports at the college level.”

Personally, I’ve had a great experience here at the Shintaro Akatsu School of Design and I’m a little sad it’s over. UB gave me just what I wanted—a chance to build a solid graphic design portfolio and play sports at the college level. (I was captain of the soccer team and we qualified for the NCAA Championship tournament!) I’m ready to find my first job as a graphic designer.

Hometown: Stockholm, Sweden

Quan Zhang, M.A. in Global Media and Communication Studies



Alumni

“My views of the world have expanded after entering this program, and I have learned so much regarding global issues.”

Why did you select UB’s Global Media and Communication Studies?
I want to be a journalist that reports on international issues, and UB offers a program that matches well with my career objectives.

What do you enjoy most about the program?
My views of the world have expanded after entering this program, and I have learned so much regarding global issues that I had not previously considered.

Tell us about your classroom experiences:
The academic environment at UB is very good, and the professors are skilled and knowledgeable.

What do you hope to do after you graduate?
I want to be a journalist, maybe for a non-government organization.

Fun Facts

Hometown: China

Education before UB
BA, Linguistics, Communication University of China, Beijing
Experiences before UB
I worked as a copywriter at a design company for a year after receiving my undergraduate degree.

Languages
Chinese, English

Patrico Larriva, M.A. in Global Development and Peace



Alumni

“There is a true connection, a bond between students and professors.”

Why did you choose UB’s Global Development and Peace Program?
I chose this program because of my career objectives to one-day work for either the government or a NGO. I knew it would prepare me well for my future to help solve real world issues.

What do you enjoy most about the program?
I truly enjoy the cultural diversity and the respect that I see between students of varied backgrounds. There is a true connection, a bond between students and professors.

What have you learned from your classroom experiences?
I have experienced so much personal growth at many different levels thanks to the experiences that I have had in the classroom.

Do you have plans following graduation?
I see myself working for the government back in my home country of Ecuador, or perhaps working for an international organization.

Fun Facts

Home country: Ecuador

Education before UB
BA, Economics with minor in Business Management Administration, Southern Connecticut State University, Connecticut

Internship experience
Princess Sumaya University, Amman, Jordan

Current employment
University of Bridgeport, Graduate Assistant

Awards and/or major achievements
Pontificia Universidad Católica, Member of School Board, Ecuador
Model UN, Member of Delegation from University of Bridgeport, New York

Languages
Spanish, English

Kingsley Udeh, M.S. in Technology Management



Alumni

“People think engineering is too difficult, and we want to build an understanding, especially among domestic students, that it’s not.”

Home country: Nigeria

When he was in high school in Nigeria, Kingsley Udeh dreamed of becoming a doctor. He wanted to help people, make a difference.

Then he went to college. “My intention was to study medicine,” he says. “But along the way, I just couldn’t keep up with the demands. It was my uncle who suggested computer science and engineering. He told me, ‘Why don’t you try it?’ When I realized I had an ability for it, I went into it. I changed plans.”

It was a far better fit. At 35, Udeh will receive his Master’s in Technology Management with a concentration in Project Management. He hopes to use his degree in IT, banking, or engineering.

In the meantime, Udeh has sought out opportunities to use his skills to help others. He developed a software system for the Bridgeport chapter of American Red Cross, for example, that allows the nonprofit to match volunteer opportunities with individuals, based on their skills, availability, and interests.

In March, Google and the Connecticut Small Business Development Center ran a day of workshops and instructional seminars at the University that showed business owners how to build websites so they could get their ventures online. Udeh was among the first to volunteer.

“We helped design and make a website for a woman who owns a boutique in New Haven,” says Udeh. “It was exciting.”

He also worked on developing a website geared to high school and college students that encourages them to test their math and engineering skills by tackling a series of challenges. “People think engineering is too difficult, and we want to build an understanding, especially among domestic students, that it’s not,” says Udeh. “This will be something where they’ll be able to log on to a web-based system and solve problems, and hopefully realize that engineering is not as complicated as they think.”